Friday, 20 October 2017

Does MS affect peripheral nerves?

There are few things that all MSologists agree on. 

Perhaps one of the least controversial statements you can make about MS is that it is a disease of the Central Nervous System - i.e. the brain, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord - and that it does not affect the peripheral nerves.

Plus ca change.


Thursday, 19 October 2017

Remyelination....a reality


Good news from repair studies! 

A few years ago Jonah Chan and his team developed a neat screening assay to show myelination (making myelin) by myelin-forming cells (oligodendrocytes). 

Monday, 16 October 2017

Barts MS at ECTRIMS 2017

In just over a week, MS researchers, Nurses and Clinicians will travel to Paris for the annual ECTRIMS conference. This is an important meeting where new research, trial results and treatment information is shared across the community. And we'd like some input from you, our readers!

Sunday, 15 October 2017

Saturday, 14 October 2017

Depletion of neutrophils after alemtuzumab

Neutrophils are your first line of defence against infection, but they express CD52 and therefore they are depleted by alemtuzumab. This will contribute to infections post treatment, but, whilst common, the level of depletion is rarely severe and long-lasting.  We have commented on this in a previous postbut you can now get a free copy of the paper.

Friday, 13 October 2017

Introducing MouseDoctor3

Hello, and thank you for reading my first post as MouseDoctor3.  Here's a brief introduction so you know my background...

Thursday, 12 October 2017

Anti-migration effect of DMF: alarms bells start ringing

This study looks at the influence of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and its active breakdown product on control of the blood brain barrier

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Advanced MS

Summary: Our position, as formerly stated, on more advanced (formerly know as progressive) MS. 

Is the term ‘progressive MS’ a misnomer? In general, progression means improvement, not worsening. We have made the case for using the term ‘advanced MS’, which we think captures the disability that comes with the later stages of MS.